Skip to Main Navigation | Skip to Content




University Relations

University of Central Missouri
Administration 302
Warrensburg, MO 64093
Phone: 660-543-4640
Fax: 660-543-4943





sabato

Political Analyst Larry Sabato to Speak at UCM

Contact: Mike Greife
WARRENSBURG, MO (Sept. 8, 2011) – The American Democracy Project at the University of Central Missouri will host political analyst Larry Sabato as part of the university’s annual celebration of Constitution Day on Wednesday, Sept. 14.

Sabato, who has been recognized by the Wall Street Journal as “probably the most quoted college professor in the land,” and by Fox News Channel as “American’s favorite political scientist,” is the director of the University of Virginia Center for Politics and the Kent Gooch Professor of Politics at the University of Virginia.

Sabato will speak on the 2012 elections at noon in Elliott Union 240. He then will lead a discussion of his most recent book, “A More Perfect Constitution,” which presents 23 proposals for amending the U.S. Constitution, at 2 p.m. in Elliott Union 236. The presentations are free and open to the public.

Following the 2 p.m. presentation, a reception and book signing is planned in the Charno Room in the Elliott Union. Sabato’s book, “A More Perfect Constitution,” is available at the University Store in the Elliott Union.

In July 2008, Sabato corrected predicted that Barack Obama would win the presidency in a near landslide, correctly forecasting that Obama would receive 53 percent of the popular vote. He also predicted that Obama would claim the electoral college count by a margin of 364-174, missing the actual count of 365-173 by only one vote. In 2006, Sabato was named the most accurate prognosticator by Fox News, CNBC, and Pew’s Project for Excellence Journalism.

Sabato is the author of 25 books on politics, including the popular “Feeding Frenzy” and “The Year of Obama.” A Rhodes Scholars, he has taught more than 15,000 students during his career at Oxford University and the University of Virginia. In 2001 he received the University of Virginia’s highest honor, the Thomas Jefferson Award.