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Building for Strength

Central Missouri Now and in 2029

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When the Morrow Health and Physical Education Building was dedicated in 1939, it commemorated the centennial of public teaching education in the U.S. Built with money from the Federal Public Works Administration, the state and the local community, it was named for Walter Morrow, an alumnus, former professor and dean who served as acting university president in 1930-31.

In the 70-plus years since then, Central Missouri has witnessed several periods of growth. In more recent history, the post-World War II GI Bill brought about major changes, and the impact of the Baby Boom fueled widespread construction on campus.

But over the past couple of decades, things have slowed down as capital funding became scarce. Incongruous as it may seem, Central Missouri is experiencing a significant influx of capital projects during an economic downturn.

Preserving the university's heritage while planning its future is a delicate balance that should not be left to chance.

Much of the credit goes to UCM President Aaron Podolefsky, who has kept in mind the theme of his 2005 inaugural address, "Remembering our past, celebrating our future." He knows that preserving the university's heritage while planning its future is a delicate balance that should not be left to chance. Recognizing the need to find other funding sources in a period of declining state support, Podolefsky has worked to find innovative ways to keep projects moving.

Working closely with Betty Roberts, vice president for administration and finance, Podolefsky has been able to develop a farsighted plan to advance the university. The plan not only encompasses the major projects now underway but establishes a vision to provide for the next generation of students.

 

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