Skip to Main Navigation | Skip to Content



Upcoming Events with the Agriculture Department

Click here for dates and information

 


Agriculture Program

Grinstead Building, Room 126
Warrensburg, MO 64093
Phone: 660.543.4240
Email: Dr. Fanson Kidwaro, Chair





goodwin

Mark Goodwin

Dr. Mark Goodwin, Asst. Professor of Agriculture - HorticultureAssistant Professor of Agriculture – Horticulture
Grinstead Bldg. 130A
660-543-8113
sgoodwin@ucmo.edu

Education
Ph.D., Purdue University
B.S., University of Louisville
B.A., Northwest Missouri State University

Career Background

Dr. Goodwin joined the faculty in 2007. Previously he was an adjunct professor teaching the Woody Ornamental Plants and Plant Propagation courses in the Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture at Purdue University in Lafayette, Indiana.  He earned his Ph.D. at Purdue conducting research in how cuticular waxes confer drought tolerance in plants, increase the shelf-life in tomato and pepper fruits and increase resistance to slug herbivory in hosta. Prior to that, he learned public horticulture first hand by working in the horticulture department at Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest in Clermont, Kentucky. Dr. Goodwin is also the manager of the UCM Greenhouse and Nursery Complex.

Professional Affiliations

Dr. Goodwin is a member of the American Society for Horticultural Science, the American Hosta Society, and the American Society of Plant Biologists.

Areas of Interest/Research

Dr. Goodwin's interests revolve around ornamental horticulture. His research program involves the study of hosta cultivars which are known to be resistant to slug damage. Of the more than 5,000 hosta cultivars developed, only a small percentage are known to be resistant to slugs, a garden pest which can completely defoliate hosta if left unchecked. Dr. Goodwin's research has uncovered cuticular wax components which are present in some blue hostas which are known to be resistant to slugs, but these components are absent on glossy green hosta cultivars which are very susceptible to slug damage. His research at UCM will continue to conduct hosta cultivar trials for slug herbivory, and analysis of the role cuticular waxes play in conferring resistance to slug herbivory in hosta.