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Institutional Research

Institutional Research





Fall 2008 Enrollment Highlights

 

  • Based on the fall 2008 Census figures, the University of Central Missouri has a total enrollment of 11,063, setting a record for the fifth consecutive fall term. Overall, 145 more new students enrolled this fall compared to one year ago, an increase of 1.3%.
  • The most significant change was observed in graduate (Master’s and Education Specialist) enrollment, which increased from a headcount of 1,999 in fall 2007 to 2,083 in fall 2008 (+84), representing a 4.2% increase. An additional 61 undergraduate students enrolled this fall, representing a one-year increase (up by just 0.6%).
  • Of the 11,063 students enrolled, approximately 81% (8,980 headcount) are undergraduate   students, and the remaining 19% are graduate students.   
  • Undergraduate enrollment consists of first-time freshmen (18%), other freshmen (9%), sophomores (18%), juniors (19%), seniors (28%) and other undergraduate enrollment (8%).
  • Enrollment of first-time freshmen increased from a headcount of 1,554 in fall 2007 to 1,613 in fall 2008, representing almost 4% increase. 
  • Decreases in undergraduate enrollment were observed at the sophomore and junior levels.  Enrollment at the sophomore level decreased from 1,690 in fall 2007 to 1,635 in fall 2008, while enrollment at the junior level also decreased from 1,721 to 1,710 during the same period.                                             
  • Women continue to be a majority at the University of Central Missouri.  Fifty-six percent (6,174 headcount) are female and 44% (4,889 headcount) are male.  Fifty-four percent of undergraduate students and 64% (1,326 headcount) of graduate students are female.  
  • The average age of undergraduate students is 22.3. About 15% are over 24 years of age. An overwhelming majority (80%) is full time and the other 20% are part time, while only 24% of graduate students are full time. Seventy-six percent of undergraduate students are white compared to 77% in fall 2007.  
  • The majority of UCM’s undergraduate students come from Missouri (91%), and 6% (576 headcount) come from other states. The number of students from Missouri increased from 9,772 in fall 2007 to 9,812 in fall 2008. Jackson County remains the largest feeder county (1,614), followed by Johnson County (939).
  • The university continues to be an ethnically diverse campus.  Identified ethnic backgrounds were white (75%), African American (6%), Hispanic (2%), Asia/Pacific Islander (1%), American Indian (0.6%), non-resident alien (4%), and unknown (12%).
  • Enrollment of American Indians increased slightly from 54 in fall 2007 to 68 in fall 2008.  The Hispanic headcount of 172 is 9 more students than in fall 2007 enrollment figures. Enrollment of non-resident aliens increased from 366 in fall 2007 to 417 in fall 2008. The international student population represents 52 countries.
  • Enrollment of non-resident undergraduate students increased slightly from 824 in fall 2007 to 839 in fall 2008. A vast majority (80%) of graduate (Master’s and Education Specialist) students are residents of Missouri.     
  • Next to Missouri, the state with the highest number of students is Kansas (268 headcount), followed by Illinois (39 headcount) and Iowa (36 headcount). With more students coming from Illinois than Iowa, UCM is beginning to see a shift in geographic origins of undergraduate students.
  • Credit hours taken by enrolled students increased from 123,859 in fall 2007 to 125,515 in fall 2008 amounting to 1,656 more credit hours in fall 2008. Undergraduate credit hours increased from 112,256 in fall 2007 to 113,393 in fall 2008. The average credit hours taken by undergraduate students is 12.6.  
  • Total full-time equivalent (FTE) enrollment increased from 8,450 in fall 2007 to 8,750 in fall 2008. Undergraduate FTE enrollment (calculated by dividing total undergraduate credit hours by 15), also increased from 7,483 in fall 2007 to 7,560 in fall 2008.
  • The average age of graduate students is 32.6. The vast majority (78%) are over 24 years of age.  Seven out of ten graduate students (70%) are white.  
  • The average credit hours taken by graduate students increased marginally from 5.7 in fall 2007 to 5.8 in fall 2008. Full-time equivalent (FTE) enrollment (calculated by dividing total graduate credit hours by 12), increased from 967 in fall 2007 to 1,010 in fall 2008, representing a 4% increase.

This enrollment analysis provides an overview for the UCM campus as of fall 2008 Census date.  Five-year reports for student demographics and credit hour enrollment by college and department are published in the university’s annual Fact Book.