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Violence & Substance Abuse Prevention

Administration Building 102
Warrensburg, MO 64093
Phone: 660.543.4044





laws

House Party Guide

Laws to be aware of:

Selling alcohol without a license
Minor in possession
Open House Party
Keg Registration
Drinking in Public Places/Open Container
Fake Id’s
Driving While Intoxicated
Noise
Public Urination
Physical Assault
Illegal parking
Littering
Drugs




If you would like to read more, follow the links below.

  • The most common reasons party hosts get in trouble with landlords, neighbors, the police or fire marsh
  • How to plan a successful party
  • How to work with police if they come to your party
  • Protecting our friends
  • Alcohol and Sexual Assault
  • Important Numbers

    Selling alcohol without a license- It is a felony offense to sell alcohol without a license to sell alcohol from the state of Missouri.  You also cannot sell cups, charge admission, collect for the utility bill, or otherwise exchange money for alcohol. If you are arrested for a felony you will be fingerprinted, which results in a criminal history for you.  So, even if you’re eventually not convicted of this charge you will have a criminal history that may be accessed by future employers.  And if you are convicted, you could face up to 2-5 years in the state department of corrections or one month to 1 year in county jail plus a fine of up to $1000.  If you want to include alcohol at the party your best option is BYOB for those 21 and over. Remember to ensure that nobody under 21 has access to alcohol.

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    Minor in possession- You must be 21 years of age to consume, purchase, or possess alcohol.  Even if you are not holding the alcohol container, but have consumed alcohol, you could be charged with Minor in Possession. This offense is a misdemeanor. A first offense typically results in a fine of not less than $250 and $24.50 court costs or two years probation and 20 hours of community service, but may result in up to the maximum penalty for a misdemeanor:  a $500 fine and/or 90 days in jail. 

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    Open House Party-  A person who knowingly allows or fails to stop any person under 21 from drinking alcohol on their property could be charged with a misdemeanor.  If you own, lease, or have the lawful right to the use of the property, you cannot allow minors to consume alcohol on the property.  Not only can the tenant be charged, but a landlord may also be found in violation.   A note for parents and guardians:  you are able to allow your own children to consume alcohol on your property, but not any other minors. 

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    Keg Registration-  All kegs are registered at purchase.  If a keg is confiscated at a party at which underage persons have consumed alcohol, the purchaser of the keg could also be charged with supplying alcohol to underage persons.

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    Drinking in Public Places/Open Container—it is illegal to have an open container of alcohol in public parking lots and on public property.  Public places are defined as any public park, parking lot, cemetery, school yard, and sidewalks.

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    Fake Id’s-  Any person who has in his/her possession any fictitious or altered license, or lends his license to another person, or uses another person’s license could be charged with a misdemeanor. 

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    Driving While Intoxicated- The legal BAC limit for driving while intoxicated is .08 for those over 21.  For minors, the legal BAC limit is .02.  Those under 21 with a BAC in excess of .02 could be charged under the Zero Tolerance legislation.  The consequences could include fines, license revocation, classes, community service, and jail time.

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    Noise-  Any person who creates unreasonably loud, disturbing, or unnecessary noise (music, yelling, etc.) in the city could be charged with a misdemeanor.  Any noise that disturbs others or that can be heard at a distance of more than 100 feet is prohibited between 11:00 PM and 7:00 am. 

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    Public Urination-  Any person who urinates in any public location could be charged with a misdemeanor.

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    Physical Assault-  Any person who engages in any fight or violence towards each other in any public place could be charged with a misdemeanor.

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    Illegal parking--  Parking in violation of city ordinance could result in a fine and/or your vehicle being towed.

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    Littering-  Throwing any item of trash on the ground could result in an arrest.  A person throwing a container of alcohol to the ground upon a police officer’s approach could be charged with littering. 

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    Drugs
    -   Hosts may be liable for drug use at the party location, depending on the circumstances.  As a host you should not allow illegal drug use at your party. 

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