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Title IX Resources

Campus Advocacy Resources

Vicitim Advocacy Hotline

Victim Advocacy Hotline: You can request a confidential victim advocate or one-on-one support and assistance 24 hours a day at 660-441-4855.

Confidential Counseling and Support

Counseling Center: The Counseling Center offers free confidential personal and social support through their licensed psychologists. Contact them at 660-543-4060 or visit them Humphreys 131 to schedule a meeting.

Limiting Contact with the Respondent and Removing Directory Information

Office of Student Experience and Engagement (SEE): If your respondent is in the same classroom as you, or is scheduled to be in future semesters or to remove your directory information (address, phone, etc.) from the university website, contact SEE at 660-543-4114 for assistance, or stop in their office in Administration 214. 

Academic and Housing Accommodations

Office of Student Experience and Engagement (SEE): The Office of Student Experience and Engagement will work to ensure proper accommodations are available. If you wish to change your housing because the respondent lives nearby, or if you have missed classroom assignments, contact them at 660-543-4114, or visit them in Administration 214. 

Making Charges against the Respondent

Public Safety: To report a crime, contact public safety at 660-543-4123 or visit them at 306 Broad Street, Warrensburg, MO 64093.

Medical Services

University Health Center: The Health Centers offers non-emergency medical care for injuries and follow-up appointments. Contact them at 660-543-4770 or visit them at 600 South College Avenue, Warrensburg, MO 64093. 

SAFE Team Escort

Student Assistant Foot Patrol and Escort (SAFE) Team: The SAFE Team can accompany you to and from courses, your residence hall or your vehicle. Call them at 660-543-4123. Hours: 8:00pm-2:30am.

Off-Campus Advocacy Resources

Sexual Assault Response Team

Sexual Assault Response Team (Off-Campus): Johnson County SART advocates are trained to offer immediate, short term emotional support and crisis intervention to victims of sexual assault in Johnson County. Victim Advocates specialize in helping the victim understand the medical, police and recovery processes, and assess safety needs and assist with referrals, all while maintaining confidential communication. To get connected with a SART advocate, call the Survival House hotline at 1-800-846-7597.

Medical Services

Western Missouri Medical Center: For emergency medical care, contact Western Missouri Medical Center at 660-747-2500 or visit them at 403 Burkarth Road, Warrensburg, MO 64093. Western Missouri Medical Center is available 24 hours a day.

Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) Service

Western Missouri Medical Center: This hospital provides certified SANE services to respond to needs specific to sexual assault. Contact Western Missouri Medical Center at 660-747-2500 or visit them at 403 Burkarth Road, Warrensburg, MO 64093. Western Missouri Medical Center is available 24 hours a day.

Bothwell Regional Health Center: This hospital provides certified SANE services to respond to needs specific to sexual assault. Contact them at 660-826-8833 or visit them at 601 East 14th Street, Sedalia, MO 65301. Bothwell Regional Health Center is available 24 hours a day.

Saint Luke’s Health System: This hospital provides certified SANE services to respond to needs specific to sexual assault. Contact them at 816-347-5000 or visit them at 100 N.E. Saint Luke’s Blvd., Lee’s Summit, MO 64086. Saint Luke’s is available 24 hours a day.

Confidential Counseling and Support

Survival Adult Abuse Center: Survival offers many support groups for victims, including male victims. Their groups are open to anyone who is or has been a victim of domestic violence and/or sexual assault. Click here for a calendar of events.

LGBTQ Resources

Kansas City Anti-Violence Project (KCAVP): A nonprofit organization committed to providing domestic violence, sexual assault, and hate crimes advocacy and education to the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and questioning community in Western Missouri and Eastern Kansas. Can make a report to KCAVP to document incidents of violence, sexual assault, and hate crimes for national/local statistics of violence against LGBTQ individuals. They will not report to the police without your consent. Contact them at 816-561-0550 to get connected to advocacy and support resources. To electronically report a crime go to: www.kcavp.org/site/report-crime

 

Other Resources

A Brief Guide to Getting Help

Getting Help Guide

A Brief Guide to Taking Action

Guide to Taking Action

Important Definitions

What is Consent?

With all cases of a sexual nature, "consent" is defined as positive cooperation in an act or behavior.

  • Consent is clear, knowing and voluntary.
  • Consent is active, not passive.
  • Silence, in and of itself, cannot be interpreted as consent.
  • The person consenting must act freely and voluntarily, have knowledge of the nature of the act and be capable of making a reasonable judgment concerning the nature of the act.
  • Legal minors are not capable of giving consent.
  • Individuals with mental disabilities may be unable to give consent.
  • Those who are intoxicated may be unable to give consent.
  • The University does not consider a lack of protest to imply consent.
  • A current or previous dating relationship is not sufficient to constitute consent.
  • Consent to any one form of sexual activity cannot automatically imply consent to any other forms of sexual activity.
  • Previous relationships or prior consent cannot imply consent to future sexual acts.

Any member of the University community who encourages, aids, assists or participates in any act of sexual misconduct against another will also be considered to have committed a violation of University policy.

Incapacitation is a state where someone cannot make rational, reasonable decisions because they lack the capacity to give knowing consent (e.g., to understand the "who, what, when, where, why or how" of their sexual interaction). Sexual activity with someone who is known to be - or based on the circumstances should reasonably have known to be - mentally or physically incapacitated (by alcohol or other drug use, unconsciousness or blackout), constitutes a violation of this policy.

This policy also covers a person whose incapacity results from mental disability, sleep, involuntary physical restraint, or from the taking of rape drugs. Possession, use and/or distribution of any of these substances, including Rohypnol, Ketomine, GHB, Burundanga, etc. is prohibited, and administering one of these drugs to another student is a violation of this policy. More information on these drugs can be found at http://www.911rape.org/

Use of alcohol or other drugs will not function as a defense to a violation of this policy. 

The sexual orientation and/or gender identity of individuals engaging in sexual activity is not relevant to allegations under this policy.

What is Force?

Force is the use of physical violence and/or imposing on someone physically to gain sexual access. Force also includes threats, intimidation (implied threats) and coercion that overcome resistance or produce consent.

What is Coercion?

Coercion is unreasonable pressure for sexual activity. Coercive behavior differs from seductive behavior based on the type of pressure someone uses to get consent from another. When someone makes clear to you that they do not want sex, that they want to stop, or that they do not want to go past a certain point of sexual interaction, continued pressure beyond that point can be coercive. 

Complaintant, Responder, Bystander

Many situations that could be violations of the sexual misconduct policy involve 2 people. We refer to these individuals as the complainant and the respondent. Other situations are more complex and may involve one or more complainants and one or more respondents. These definitions do not imply any legal wrongdoing. The university’s process is designed to determine whether or not a respondent has violated policy, remediate the situation, and prevent future harm.

  • Complainant(s) - A complainant is a person who makes a formal complaint about sexual misconduct with the goal of having it addressed by the university.
  • Respondent(s) - A respondent is a person who may be in violation of the university’s policy of sexual misconduct.
  • Bystander(s) - A bystander is someone who sees or has knowledge of a possible policy violation.

Preponderance of the Evidence Standard

The preponderance of the evidence standard requires proving it is more likely than not that sexual violence occurred. This is the standard of proof that must be used in a school’s Title IX proceedings, including fact finding and hearing procedures for resolving complaints of student-on-student sexual violence.

What is Retaliation?

Retaliation is the act of intimidating, threatening, coercing, or in any way discriminating against an individual because of the individual’s informal or formal complaint or participation in a school or Office of Civil Rights (OCR) investigation or proceedings related to sexual violence or other civil rights concerns. Federal civil rights laws, including Title IX, make it unlawful to retaliate against an individual for the purpose of interfering with any right or privilege secured by these laws. UCM will not allow any form of retaliation against complainants. Please notify the Title IX Coordinator or the Office of Public Safety immediately if you believe you are the subject of retaliation.

Retaliatory Complaints

It is not uncommon for the respondent(s) in sexual misconduct cases to assert counter claims against the complainant(s). These complaints may constitute a form of retaliation intended to silence or punish the complainant(s). The university will inform the complainant(s) of retaliatory complaints and reserves the right, under careful evaluation, to decline action on retaliatory complaints by the respondent(s).

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