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Dr. Scott Huff

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Assistant Professor
Human Development and Family Science
Health Center 102
shuff@ucmo.edu
660-543-8290

Education

  • Doctor of Philosophy in Human Development and Family Studies, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (2015)
  • Master of Arts in Human Development and Family Studies, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (2010)
  • Bachelors of Science in Marriage, Family, and Human Development Brigham Young University, Provo, UT (2008)

Dr. Huff earned his doctorate in Human Development and Family Studies, specializing in Marriage and Family Therapy, from the University of Connecticut. After that, he worked for several years as a clinician and research director at a long-term treatment center for adolescent girls in southern Utah. A Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, Dr. Huff is the program director for UCM's Marriage and Family Therapy specialization in the Human Development and Family Science Master degree program. Dr. Huff's research interests include divorced co-parenting and understanding and improving clinical outcomes for Marriage and Family Therapists.

 

Publications

Gürmen, M. S., Huff, S. C, Brown, E., Orbuch, T. L., & Birditt, K. S. (2017). Divorced yet still together: ongoing personal relationship and coparenting among divorced parents. Journal of Divorce & Remarriage, 58(8), 645-660.  

Huff, S. C., Anderson, S. R., Adamsons, K. L., & Tambling, R. B. (2017). Development and validation of a scale to measure children's contact refusal of parents following divorce. The American Journal of Family Therapy,  45(1), 66-77.

Johnson, L. N., Rambing, R. B., Mennenga, K. D., Ketring, S. A., Oka, M., Anderson, S. R., Huff, S. C., Miller, R. B. (2016). Examining attachment avoidance and attachment anxiety across eight sessions of couple therapy. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 42(2), 195-212.

Huff, S. C, Anderson, S. R. & Tambling, R. B. (2016). Testing the clinical implications of planned missing data designs. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 42(2), 313-325.

 

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