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Biochemistry and Chemistry Programs

W.C. Morris Building
Room 417
Warrensburg, MO 64093
Phone: 660-543-4948
Fax: 660-543-8142



Jargocki, Dr. Kris

CURRICULUM VITAE

CHRISTOPHER JARGOCKI


1.PERSONAL DATA

 Current position: Christopher Jargocki (pronounced ‘Yargodzki’)
                                        Nom de plume: Christopher Jargodzki
                             Professor of Physics
                                        Department of  Physics
                                        University of Central Missouri
                                        Warrensburg, MO 64093
 

2. EDUCATION

 University of California, Irvine   Ph.D. Elementary Particle Theory  1981
  Director: Myron Bander. Thesis title: A Field-theoretical investigation of
        2-D Coulomb Systems with Short-range Yukawa Repulsion, 118 pp.
            Area: Investigation of Cooperative Phenomena in Quantum Field Theories
           Using Path Integral Techniques

 University of California, Los Angeles   B.S.   Physics                        1966

 University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland                                           1961-2

3a. EMPLOYMENT HISTORY

2006- Center for Cooperative Phenomena - hosted by the Department
of Physics – Founder and Director
  
2004 Promoted to Professor of Physics

1998 Promoted to Associate Professor of Physics

1996 Awarded tenure

1991-98 Assistant Professor of Physics at University of Central Missouri

1983-91 Lecturer in Physics, Northeastern University, Boston.
In addition to teaching standard physics courses, he developed a core curriculum course, Introduction to Science, that combined the history of physics and astronomy with the philosophy of
science and the relationship between science and religion.
After Dr. Jargocki redesigned the course in 1985-6, the annual enrollment in it increased from 150 to 900 students


1981-83 Visiting Assistant Professor of  Physics, Northeastern University,
Boston

1978-81 Summer Instructor, Teaching and Research Assistant,
Dept. of Physics, University of California, Irvine

1966-78 Employment in the California aerospace industry as a
scientific programmer and, later, a systems analyst; Duties
included writing FORTRAN programs for mathematics, science, and engineering applications, and progressing to designing FORTRAN-based software for underwater signal detection using the Fast Fourier Transform

Translator of books and articles from Russian, Polish,
German, and French  for SCITRAN, INC. and American
Mathematical Society (part time); Author of physics books.
                                    During 1978-79 replaced Isaac Asimov as editor of Science Quiz column in Science Digest  (part time)


Courses Taught:

 Physics 1101  College Physics I (Lecture and Laboratory)
  Physics 1103/4 Introduction to the Sciences: Physics (Lecture and Laboratory)
  Physics 1611 Physics of Sound (Lecture and Laboratory)
  Physics 2121 University Physics I (Lecture and Laboratory)
  Physics 3110 Introduction to Astrophysics
  Physics 3511 Modern Physics I (Lecture and Laboratory)
  Physics 3611 Optics (Lecture and Laboratory)
  Physics 4013 Solid State Physics Laboratory
  Physics 4512 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics
  Physics 4513 Solid State Physics (Lecture)
  Physics 4711 Atomic and Nuclear Physics
  Physics 4911 Special Problems in Physics

IGen 4236 (Science and Religion: From Conflict to Dialogue), an award-winning course, was offered for the first time in the Fall of 1999 as a part of the Integrative Studies program. The course is

Two textbooks were selected and test materials developed. New handouts and test materials are still being developed based on student response.

HONR 3000-02 Fall 2003 The Mystery of Time (Honors Colloquium)
 
  The Newtonian concepts of absolute time and space were already attacked by Leibniz, Newton’s great contemporary. Following Leibniz, Einstein held that space and time had no objective reality. The purpose of the colloquium is to re-examine the concept of time in view of advances in modern physics, cosmology, biology, and brain science. Some of the questions will include:
  Is time real? Does it flow in one direction only? Does it have a beginning or end? Can the flow of time be stopped? Is time travel possible? Does time have a structure? Is it possible to foretell the future? What is eternity? For centuries,   these questions have intrigued mystics, philosophers, and scientists. This colloquium will explore a number of topics including clocks and calendars, time in modern physics and science fiction, biological clocks, altering consciousness of time, prediction vs. precognition, time ’s arrow in cosmology, and many others. No previous knowledge of physics is required. The class
  will be based on selected readings, handouts, videos, and movies such as H. G. Wells ’ Time Machine.

HONR 3000-0 Fall 2002 Mysticism – West and East (Honors Colloquium)

 The aim of the colloquium is to look at the empirical component of the religious inquiry into the nature of reality. A body of empirical data is now being accumulated in areas ranging from the neuroscience of the mystical states of awareness, to the heuristics of the near-death experience, and the scientific research into prayer and meditation. Mysticism (or spirituality) is to religion what basic research is to science. In a mystical experience one comes in direct contact with the sacred and the transcendent, evoking a response of bliss, ecstasy, awe, intense love, and sometimes a temporary loss of self and a sense of being reborn. When repeated, such extraordinary states transform an individual to produce saintly compassion, mystical illumination, and a sense of being connected to the Universe.

 The class will focus on mystical traditions, west and east, and modern examples of individuals who remain in the world and yet are on the path, using videos, handouts, and selected readings.

3b. TEACHING PHILOSOPHY

 The teaching philosophy followed in my twenty-eight years of teaching physics at the university level is expressed in my publications in the area of physics education: Emphasize conceptual problems, semiquantitative problems (e.g., how one quantity changes as a function of another; direct proportion, inverse proportion, approximations, etc.), and critical thinking (by challenging the preconceptions and correcting the misconceptions), in addition to the standard quantitative problems. Produce cognitive dissonance by challenging students with paradoxes and fallacies.

 Numerous studies published in the American Journal of Physics show that students can learn to solve physics problems by imitating the examples given in the text and in class enough to pass a course without much insight into the underlying concepts. Conversely, those who emphasize conceptual problems end up not only with higher scores on the standard problems but also with greater student enthusiasm about the subject. My four books in the area of physics education, the last two co-authored by Dr. Franklin Potter, have been published in German, Spanish, Greek, Japanese, Chinese, Korean, and Hindi, indicating that many science teachers around the world are appreciative of this type of approach. Moreover, in the last twenty years an increasing amount of attention has been paid in mainstream physics textbooks to (apparent) paradoxes and fallacies. I like to think, perhaps immodestly, that my publications have contributed to this trend.
    
 

4. SCHOLARSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS,  AWARDS, AND MEDIA WORK

10/05 Photography session with Jim Pinkston from the UCM University Relations office. The photographs were published in the Kansas City Star as part of the UCM publicity campaign

2005 Nominated by Wayne Stalick (Chair) as a candidate for the Governor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching

2004 Sabbatical Leave: Fall Semester 2004

2002 The book Mad About Physics was selected by the New York Public Library as one of the best books of the year 2001
 
1998 Nominated  by John Gieniec (Professor of Physics) as a candidate for the 1997 Faculty Achievement Award

1997 Sabbatical Leave: Fall Semester 1997
 
1996 Entered the 1996 worldwide Science and Religion Course Competition sponsored by the John Templeton Foundation. The course was chosen for an award of $10,000 split evenly between the university and myself

11/19/91    TV interview: University Magazine: New Faces (KMOS TV )

5. RESEARCH GRANTS

10/05 Submitted a second grant application to the Metanexus Institute, involving an expanded program narrative and a larger number of participants. The proposal was funded for $15,000 (with $15,000
   in matching funds).

3/05 Submitted a grant application to the Metanexus Institute, Philadelphia, under the auspices of the Local Societies Initiative for the Constructive Engagement of Science and Religion. The grant is for a minimum of  $15,000 paid over three years (with $15,000 in matching funds to be provided by University of Central Missouri) to fund start-up costs for a dialogue group exploring the dynamic interface between religion and science, ultimately to evolve into the Center for Cooperative Phenomena. The proposal was not funded.

6/02 Awarded a grant by the Templeton Foundation to cover room and board for the “Truth in Science, Truth in Religion” workshop at Harvard University. Approximate value: $600

5/00 Submitted an application for a development grant to the Science and Religion Course Program at the Center for Theology and the Natural Sciences, Berkeley, CA. The grant application was funded
   for $2,000 
 
1/96 Recipient of an internal grant from the Arts and Sciences budget  to help finance the fiber optics project. The proposal was funded  for $1,500

10/95 Recipient of an internal grant from the UCM Foundation Physics
   Fund to provide funding for computer software and fiber optics apparatus. The proposal was funded for $1,000

3/95 Applied for a Technology Research Grant. This was a followup to the Faculty Research Grant and was designed specifically to provide funding for fiber optics apparatus. The proposal was funded internally for $5,000

10/94 Applied for an internal Faculty Research Grant in the amount of $19,070. Project title: Solitons in Nonlinear Optics and Field Theory.The proposal was based on my previous research at the
   University of California and Northeastern University in the area of soliton field theory and cooperative phenomena in quantum field theories. The proposal was funded for $4,000

12/91 Applied for start-up funds for Project Micro-Observatory – a low-cost computer-driven automated imaging telescope that could enable students to do original research in astrophysics. A visit to the Harvard- Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA in August of 1992, however, revealed that the development of the Micro-Observatory was seriously behind schedule. As a result the grant application was shelved.

6. PROFESSIONAL  INTERESTS

 Cooperative Phenomena in Quantum Field Theories, Environmental Physics, Computational Physics, Philosophy of Science, Science and Religion

7. PUBLICATIONS

A. Books

 (1) Christopher Jargodzki, Science and Religion – From Conflict to Dialogue
  (tentative title), a textbook of science and religion (in progress)

(2) Franklin Potter and Christopher Jargodzki, Mad About Modern Physics –
Braintwisters, Paradoxes, and Curiosities, John Wiley & Sons, New York,
2005, 312 pp, Index, paperback.

The book features 244 physics challenges, with solutions, ranging over the field of modern physics with additional chapters dealing with the physics of time and space, astrophysics, cosmology, and 21st century technology. Common sense conjecture and proper physical reasoning often clash throughout this volume. Indeed, many of the challenges were devised to undermine physical preconceptions by employing paradoxes to create cognitive dissonance. Philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein considered paradoxes to be an embodiment of disquietude, and as history shows, these disquietudes often foreshadow revolutionary developments in our thinking about the natural world. The counterintuitive upheavals resulting from relativity theory and quantum mechanics in the twentieth century only enhanced the reputation of the paradox as an agent for change in our understanding of physical reality.

In addition, the book features an extensive set of follow-up references to books and journal articles, and a collection of marginalia including historical tidbits, eerie coincidences, and unusual quotations from Albert Einstein to comedian Steven Wright.

(3) Christopher Jargodzki and Franklin Potter, Mad About Physics – Brain- twisters, Paradoxes, and Curiosities, John Wiley & Sons, New York, 2001, 320 pp, Index, paperback. E-book edition, 2001. Japanese language edition, 2002. Korean language edition, 2002. Chinese language edition, 2003. Hindi language edition, 2004. Indonesian language edition, 2005. German language edition, 2005. Greek language edition, 2006.The English language edition is now in its sixth printing.

The book contains 397 physics challenges, with solutions, ranging over the entire field of classical physics with three additional chapters dealing with the physics of sports, earth sciences, and astronomy. Over 300 follow-up references to books and journal articles are also included. In addition the book contains an extensive set of diagrams and marginalia. The degree of difficulty ranges from problems that require only introductory college physics to research-level paradoxes that have challenged physicists for decades.

The book has been used as a textbook at Illinois State University and University of Central Missouri.

An excellent review of  Mad About Physics was published in Physics World (July 2001), a British physics journal. The review included the phrase: “fascinating new book.” Library of Science, a national science book club, chose Mad About Physics, as one of its seven selections for June 2001. Each month Library of Science selects 7-8 books in disciplines ranging from astronomy and physics through biology and neurosciences for its members. In July 2001 the book was also discussed extensively on Prof. Michio Kaku’s National Public Radio program.

(4) Christopher Jargocki, More Science Braintwisters and Paradoxes, Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., 1983, hardcover. Selected by the Book-of- the-Month-Club, the Library of Science, and the Natural Science Book Club. Choice magazine review: “…even better than the author’s first book…” German language edition, 1986.

The book attempts to help the student progress from the formal to the postformal cognitive domain.
 

(5) Christopher Jargocki, Science Braintwisters, Paradoxes, and Fallacies, Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1976, hardcover. Selected by the Library of Science and the Natural Science Book Clubs. The Physics
Teacher (2/77): “Most of the situations can be raised in physics classes and the answers are full of novel and thoughtful insights… This book will be very valuable to physics teachers.” Paperback edition, 1978. Japanese language edition, 1981. Spanish language edition, 1985. German language edition, 1989. New Spanish language edition, 1994. Adopted as a textbook by the University of Dortmund, Germany.

The book attempts to help the student develop postformal cognitive skills and undermine  preconceptions in physics and astronomy by employing paradoxes to create cognitive dissonance.


B. Papers Published in Refereed Journals

 Fall ’93 Teleology versus Natural Selection in Anthropic Cosmology,
    Proceedings of the Institute for Liberal Studies, Vol.4

 10/83  R. Aaron, M. H. Friedman, and C. P. Jargocki, Calculations
    of q exp 2 q exp -2 States in Potential Theory, Phys. Rev. D
    28, 10/1/83

 1/81  C. Jargocki and M. Bander, Field-Theoretic Version of a
    Two-dimensional Coulomb Gas with Repulsive Cores,
    Phys. Rev. B 23, 1/1/1981

C. Published Abstracts

 2/05  Abstract of  Time as an Illusion: Are Science and Religion
    Converging in their View of Time  selected for publication on a UCM website representing Faculty Research Days

Da. Papers Presented at Professional Society Meetings

 6/6/06  From Reductionism to Emergence: Science Takes a
    Cooperative Turn, solo refereed paper presented at  “Continuity + Change: Perspectives on Science and Religion,”  an international conference sponsored by the Metanexus Institute in Philadelphia, PA;

 4/5/02  Time as an Illusion: Are Science and Religion Converging  in Their View of Time?, solo presentation at the Thirteenth National Conference on Science and Culture at Kentucky
    State University, Frankfort, KY

 10/27/01 Challenging Students’ Preconceptions with Paradoxes and Counterintuitive Problems, solo presentation at the American  Association of Physics Teachers – Missouri Section meeting
    at Southeast Missouri State University, Cape Girardeau, MO
 
  7/29/97 In Search of Cosmic Optimality, solo presentation at the 1997 John Templeton Workshop in Science-Religion Course Development at Oxford University, Oxford, U.K.

 4/26/97 Is It Possible to Teach an Objective Course on the Relationship between Science and Religion?, solo refereed paper presented at the annual meeting of the Missouri Academy of Science at
    UCM

 4/22/95 Derivation of Quark Mass Spectra from the Finite Rotational  Subgroups of SU(2)xU(1), a review paper presented at the annual meeting of the Missouri Academy of Science at Northwest Missouri State University

 8/11/94 Cultural Paradigm Approach in the Teaching of Introductory Science for the Non-Science Student, solo refereed paper presented at the national meeting of the American Association of Physics Teachers at Notre Dame University. Presentation was supported by $250 from the Faculty Professional Travel Fund

 4/9/94  Cosmology and Cellular Automata, solo refereed paper presented at the Fifth National Conference on Science, Technology, and Religious Ideas at Kentucky State University, Frankfort, KY. Presentation was supported by $280 from the Faculty Professional Travel Fund

 4/3/93  Teleology versus Natural Selection in Anthropic Cosmology, solo refereed paper presented at the Fourth National Conference on Science, Technology, and Religious Ideas at Kentucky
    State University, Frankfort, KY. Presentation was supported by $320 from the Faculty Professional Travel Fund and $112 from the Arts and Sciences Travel Fund

Db. Talks given at UCM

 5/16/06 Speaker, “The Nature of Time in Modern Physics,” a guest lecture presented in Philosophy of Science, a course taught by Dr. Brian Brost

 4/21/04 Speaker, “Synergy: The Universe as a Cooperative Phenomenon,” a guest lecture presented in a new philosophy course,  “Challenges and Controversies: Religion, Understanding, and
    Culture ” taught by Dr. Brian Brost

  9/13/02 Speaker, Frontiers in Physics and Astronomy: The Unbearable Lightness of Being: Are Time and Space Real?

 4/95  Speaker and Panelist, Honors Colloquium on Post-Communist Europe taught by Dr. Dot Robbins

 12/94  Speaker and Panelist, Honors Colloquium on Post-Communist Europe taught by Dr. Dot Robbins

 4/14/94 Speaker, Frontiers in Physics and Astronomy: Is the Universe a Computer? Cosmology and Cellular Automata

 3/18/93 Speaker, Frontiers in Physics and Astronomy: How to Make a Universe in Your Own Garage – Cosmology and the Inflationary Scenario

 4/29/92 Speaker, Frontiers in Physics and Astronomy: Quark Confinement in Quantum Chromodynamics

 3/3/92  Speaker, Frontiers in Physics and Astronomy: Polarization of the Vacuum

 11/25/91 Speaker, Frontiers in Physics and Astronomy: Quantum Chromodynamics – The Story of Quarks and Gluons (II)

 11/14/91 Speaker, Frontiers in Physics and Astronomy: Quantum Chromodynamics – The Story of Quarks and Gluons (I)

Dc. Talks given at University of California, Irvine, as part of a graduate student seminar series

 8/14/80 Vortices and Their Dynamics

 8/7/80  Speeds of Animals: Arguments Based on Biophysics and the Anthropic Principle

 8/5/80  Dimensional Arguments

 7/31/80 Why a Ham Sandwich Is Better Than Eternal Happiness –  Paradoxes in Logic and Physics
 
   

8. CONFERENCES AND WORKSHOPS

 6/3-6/06 “Continuity + Change: Perspectives on Science and Religion,” an international conference organized by the Metanexus Institute at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Attended as a delegate of the Center for Cooperative Phenomena.

 4/2-3/05 National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) convention in Dallas, TX.

 6/29-7/3/02 Selected from a pool of candidates to participate in a workshop “Truth in Science, Truth in Religion” at Harvard University

 3/31-4/01/01 National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) convention in St. Louis, MO. Made an appearance at the John Wiley & Sons exhibit and signed copies of  Mad About Physics

 6/7-11/96 “Science-Religion Course Development,” a workshop sponsored by the Templeton Foundation for the winners of the Templeton award, Gordon College, MA

 2/28/96 “Preparing Faculty for Integrative Interdisciplinary, and Capstone Courses, ” a faculty workshop, UCM, Warrensburg, MO

 1/26-29/96 “Science-Religion Course Development,” a workshop sponsored by the John M. Templeton Foundation, Mills College, Oakland, CA. Received $500 in Professional Enhancement funds to finance travel expenses

 4/27/95 “Tenure and Promotions,” a faculty workshop, UCM, Warrensburg, MO

 4/12/95 “Using Cognitive Development to Foster Critical Thinking and Mature Valuing Across the Curriculum, ” a faculty workshop, UCM, Warrensburg, MO

 5/10-11/94 CLEO ’94 (Conference and Exhibit on Lasers and Electro-Optics), Anaheim, CA

 12/13-18/92 16th Texas Symposium on Relativistic Astrophysics and 3rd Symposium on Particles, Strings, and Cosmology, University of California, Berkeley

 10/24/91 “Grantsmanship,” a faculty workshop, UCM, Warrensburg, MO

 3/25-29/91 2nd  Symposium on Particles, Strings, and Cosmology (PASCOS),
    Northeastern University, Boston, MA
 
  3/27-31/90 1st Symposium on Particles, Strings, and Cosmology (PASCOS),  Northeastern University, Boston, MA. The speakers included Alan Guth, Stephen Hawking, Frank Wilczek, and Sydney
    Coleman

 11/19-21/80 Statistical Mechanics Conference at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, N.J. Among the speakers were the Nobel Prize winners Philip Anderson and Gerald ‘t Hooft

 11/30-12/1/79 High Energy Physics conference organized by the UC Irvine Physics Dept. at the Airporter Inn. Among the attendees were the Nobel Prize winners Richard Feynman  and Abdus Salam, as well as Howard Georgi

 2/13-18/79 High-Energy Physics conference at Caltech. Among the speakers were the Nobel laureates Murray Gell-Mann and Frank Wilczek, as well as Howard Georgi, and Curtis Callan
   

 1/18/79 Lecture by Steven Weinberg at Caltech. Attended with the UC Irvine particle physics group: the future Nobel Prize winner Frederick Reines, Jonas Schultz, and Meinhard Meyer  

 12/18/78 Particles and Fields Conference at UCLA 
   
  8/1-18/78  “La Jolla Workshop on Quantum Chromodynamics” hosted by the University of California, San Diego Physics Dept.and devoted partly to the dilute instanton gas approximation to the QCD vacuum. The lecturers included Curtis Callan, Roger Dashen, and the future Nobel Prize winner David Gross, all from Princeton University

 5/12/78 John Pellam Symposium at UC Irvine, in memoriam of the eminent low-temperature physicist John Pellam. Speakers included the Nobel laureate Richard Feynman and UCI physics faculty
 
9. DIRECTED STUDENT RESEARCH

 Honors Theses:

Spring ‘05 Robert W. Lashlee III, “Fish Schooling: A Look at the Phenomena, the History of the Research, and a New Behavioral Model ” . A study in nonlinear dynamics utilizing Eulerian and Lagrangian techniques

Spring ‘00 R. Joseph Rick, “It Comes From Space” . A study of the defensive strategies for protecting Earth from the possibility of collision with comets and asteroids, utilizing the differential equations of celestial dynamics
   
 Spring ’95 Gilliam and Stropes. A Physics of Sound project involving musical composition using computer techniques and acoustic instruments Spring ’94 Drue Cohoon. A solid-state physics study of the crystallization rates in microwave baths

 
 Supervision of Special  Student Projects: 

Spring ’01 –    Danielle Theiss, Physics 4911, Physics and Research in Fall ‘02 the area of science and religion

 Fall ’96 Provided optics advice and equipment to a biology student investigating the effect of radiation on bacterial growth

 Spring ’96 Senior project in holography and fiber optics

 Fall ’94 Projects in Fiber Optics

 Spring ’94 Foster and Engelbrecht: Projects in Holography

 Fall ’92 Diane Watkins, Physics 3020: Readings in Astrophysics

10. PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES AND HONORARIES

 A. Membership
   
    American Association of Physics Teachers
    American Physics Society

 B. Listing in Honorary Publications\

   Marquis Who’s Who in America – Science and Engineering

 C. Google rank

   Jargocki (and Jargodzki) yields about 20,000 hits

11. UNIVERSITY SERVICE

A. University Committees

 Faculty Senate Arbitration Pool                                      2002/03
  Arts and Sciences Achievement Awards Committee  1996 –

B. Department Committees

 Physics Search Committee     1991 -
  Chemistry Search Committee 
  Department Chair Search Committee    
  Awards Committee (Chair)
  R, P, T, & MP Committee
  Assessment Committee
 

C. Advisor for the Bachelor of Science in Physics programs  1991 –

D. Judge, Science Olympiad      1992 – 2002
     Judge, UCM Science Fair    1992 - 2002 
  
E. Miscellaneous

3/29/01 Co-convener: Arranged Dr. Franklin Potter’s visit to
    UCM. The visit included a presentation by Dr. Potter entitled “All Things Great and Small – Six Great Scientific Ideas of the 20th Century, ” followed by a book-signing party and dinner at Dr. Powers ’
    house. Dr. Potter is a co-author of  Mad About Physics

Fall ’97  Supervised Dr. Kumar, my sabbatical replacement,
    in his teaching duties

Spring ’97 Provided free consultation to Dr. Patrick Casey of the UCM Music Dept. The objective was to improve the acoustic environment in the instrumental rehearsal room based on the measurements of the decibel levels at various locations and under various conditions

 ’94 -   Occasional consultant to the campus newspaper The Muleskinner in matters related to science and religion, and international affairs